Motlow’s Pat Hendrix: “People need to know about Sepsis”

Pat Hendrix, Dean of Nursing and Allied Health, and organizer of the first annual Think Sepsis First Conference at Motlow State Moore County campus on Sept. 13, invites the healthcare and medical community, caregivers and the general public to learn about this important healthcare topic. Motlow Staff Photo.

Pat Hendrix, Dean of Nursing and Allied Health, and organizer of the first annual Think Sepsis First Conference at Motlow State Moore County campus on Sept. 13, invites the healthcare and medical community, caregivers and the general public to learn about this important healthcare topic. Motlow Staff Photo.

Dean of Nursing and Allied Health committed to saving lives through awareness and Think Sepsis First Conference.

Motlow State will hold the first annual Think Sepsis First Conference Sept. 13, beginning at 8:15 a.m. on the Moore County campus. The conference will focus on educating caregivers and healthcare providers concerning the seriousness and the warning signs and symptoms of sepsis, an often-fatal medical condition.

Through the generosity of the College and sponsors of the conference, admission is free for all students and Motlow faculty. For all other attendees, the cost is $30. Continuing education credits will be available. All registered attendees will receive a tee shirt and enjoy snacks and lunch. Online registration is now available. Registration check-in at the event will begin at 8:15 a.m. with the program starting at 9 a.m.

Sepsis is the leading cause of death of hospitalized patients.
— Pat Hendrix, Dean of Nursing and Allied Health

“Motlow is excited to provide a Sepsis awareness conference for students and the community,” said Pat Hendrix, dean of nursing and allied health and the leader of the conference planning. “Sepsis is the leading cause of death of hospitalized patients. While the healthcare community is implementing practices to reduce this statistic, it is imperative that all current and future healthcare providers are educated and motivated to “Think Sepsis First.”

According to Hendrix, support from the healthcare community for the conference has been strong and is an indicator of the importance of this topic. Sponsors are Saint Thomas Health, Southern TN Regional Health System, the family of John J. Smith, Lincoln Health System, Motlow State Community College and Tennova Healthcare-Harton. The presenters at the conference are sepsis experts from healthcare facilities including Vanderbilt, Saint Thomas Health, and Southern TN Regional Health System.

The idea for the conference came when John J. Smith, husband of Motlow State employee Debra Smith, died unexpectedly from sepsis. It is the belief of the family that had they been aware of sepsis and the emergency it represents; John would have survived.

“I am on a mission to empower and educate everyone about the risk of sepsis, even for those who are healthy,” said Debra Smith. “It is important for family members to realize they are part of the healthcare team for their loved one and need to be proactive recognizing and responding to symptoms.”

To register and for more information about the conference, go to mscc.edu/thinksepsis.