Motlow State to present Dr. Fredrick Douglass Dixon to celebrate Black History Month

Dr. Fredrick Douglass Dixon is the featured lecturer as part of the Black History Month celebration at Motlow State. Dixon, an expert in African American Studies, will speak on Tuesday, Feb. 12 for two lectures at 9:40 a.m. and 11:10 a.m. at Powers Auditorium in Eoff Hall on the Motlow Moore County campus. The public is invited.

Dr. Fredrick Douglass Dixon is the featured lecturer as part of the Black History Month celebration at Motlow State. Dixon, an expert in African American Studies, will speak on Tuesday, Feb. 12 for two lectures at 9:40 a.m. and 11:10 a.m. at Powers Auditorium in Eoff Hall on the Motlow Moore County campus. The public is invited.

Motlow State Community College will present Dr. Fredrick Douglass Dixon, assistant professor of African American and Diaspora Studies at the University of Wyoming, to celebrate Black History Month. Dr. Dixon will present two, one-hour interactive lectures on Tuesday, Feb. 12, at 9:40 a.m. and 11:10 a.m. in Powers Auditorium inside Eoff Hall on the Moore County campus.

Dixon is a celebrated lecturer and expert in African American Studies, and specializes in the history of education, African American Studies, and African American History. He is a champion of education through serving as faculty, mentor, and student-advocate, as well as a community leader.

He earned a Ph.D. in Education, Policy, Organization, and Leadership/African American Studies from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, a master’s degree from Northeastern Illinois University, and a bachelor’ degree from Purdue University.

According to Dixon, self-improvement is the basis for community development.

The thrust of my existence is to elevate the whole of the Black community to higher levels of academic excellence.
— Dr. Fredrick Douglass Dixon

“The thrust of my existence is to elevate the whole of the Black community to higher levels of academic excellence,” said Dixon, who is devoted to providing successful pathways for the most at-risk students to access, matriculate, and achieve the ultimate goal of graduation. “This devotion,” Dixon adds, “is my indispensable duty.”

Before earning his doctorate, Professor Dixon, a life-long resident of Chicago, dedicated more than a decade to educating and servicing diverse student populations. He re-invented the current Associate of African American Studies degree at Kennedy-King College in Chicago. His theories regarding connecting formal education with the broader Black community led to his accepting the position of Co-Chair with Chicago's Council on Black Studies, a local affiliate of the National Black Council on Black Studies.

Dixon’s lectures will parallel Motlow’s Black History Month theme of Black Migration, which focuses on the movement of African Americans to new destinations and subsequently to new social realities.

“I am honored that Dr. Dixon will bring his message to our campus constituencies,” said Charle Coffey, Motlow assistant professor. “He is an excellent speaker who paints vivid word pictures and brings the subject to life.I encourage everyone to take advantage of hearing his message; you will not be disappointed.”